Bullrout (Notesthes robusta)

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Bullrout

Bullrout-8460.jpg
Bullrout

Notesthes robusta

208 Litres (55 US G.)

25-30 cm (9.8-11.8")

sg

1 - 1.010

pH

6.5 - 8.0

18 -23 °C (64.4-73.4°F)

6-16 °d

1:1 M:F

Carnivore
Live Foods
Other (See article)

8-12 years

Family

Tetrarogidae



Additional names

Kroki, Freshwater Stonefish, Freshwater Scorpionfish, Bullrout

Additional scientific names

Centropogon robustus


Sexing[edit | edit source]

It's very difficult to visually sex this fish.


Tank compatibility[edit | edit source]

N. robusta should only be housed with fish that are too large to fit their mouths, as they are voracious predators that are capable of eating reasonably sized fish. Tankmates should also be nonaggressive. Several individuals can typically be kept in a tank without problems.


Diet[edit | edit source]

Carnivorous; will eat anything that fits in its mouth. Prefers live food such as worms, shrimp, and fish, but can be weaned onto other foods.


Feeding regime[edit | edit source]

Feed once a day.


Environment specifics[edit | edit source]

Requires a mature tank with plenty of rock and bogwood hiding places.


Behaviour[edit | edit source]

Nocturnal and bottom-dwelling. The Bullrout is generally motionless, pretending to be a rock, until prey comes close, when it is engulfed. The Bullrout will then return to being a rock.


Identification[edit | edit source]

The Bullrout has a large head with seven spines on the operculum. It has a big mouth with a protruding lower jaw. The spinous dorsal fin is slightly concave posteriorly and the last soft dorsal ray is attached by a membrane to the caudal peduncle. The body is covered with small scales but the head is scaleless. It's colouration is variable from pale yellowish to dark brown, with blotches and marbling of dark brown, red-brown, grey or black. These markings sometimes form broad irregular bands. This fish has venomous dorsal, anal and pelvic spines. A sting from these fins is said to be excruciatingly painful.

Pictures[edit | edit source]

External links[edit | edit source]